Just How Much a Will Can Tell You

When my 3x great grandfather Charles Chapman Heritage wrote his will in 1857  he  provided a clear picture of  life in the Heritage family for future generations to peruse.

Charles was a publican and grocer who lived in the village of Aston Cantlow near Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire and his will details not only all the land and property he owned and leased, but also provides an insight into what it would have been like to step into the Heritage family home at this time. I also feel that it gives an indication of his character  too, as you shall see.

If you look on page 133 of Tracing Your Ancestors Through Death Records you will see an image of the entry that relates to his will in the National Probate Calendar. Here it refers to ‘The will as contained in Writings marked A and B of Charles Chapman Heritage’ and the ‘B’ referred to is an inventory of goods to be left to his widow. He was obviously a man who thought ahead and wanted to head off any problems before they occurred.

Charles had been married twice: by his first wife Elizabeth Clements, who died in 1822, he had had two surviving children William and Elizabeth and by Margaret (Elizabeth’s sister) he had had one son Charles. Although his son William had died intestate in 1857 (I wonder if this was what prompted Charles to write his own will) William had left five dependent children behind him and so potentially there were still four different parts of the family for Charles senior  to consider when dividing his estate – his widow, his daughter Elizabeth, his son Charles and the children of his son William.

His will is extremely detailed filling seven A4 pages s and in it he deals with every aspect of his estate and to whom it should be given. He was particularly concerned that Margaret should receive certain goods which, in the main, came from the family home. The wonderful thing for me is that he listed these items according to which room they were in, so not only do I learn discover just what Margaret and Charles had in their house but I also get a feel for the layout of the house. And the inventory, which I have transcribed below (updating some of the spelling where it is not obvious), is a good indicator of the comparative comfort in which this generation of the family lived. It also provides a useful picture of what was in a fairly typical middle class home at this time albeit bearing in mind that Charles  ran a pub with shops attached. I think the inventory makes fascinating reading and and, as usual, a document like this also produces further questions – not just as to what exactly some of the items were – but more importantly just where the ‘Famley Bible’ ,  went! If only I could trace that then I might be able to  confirm the identity Charles’ grandfather which has been my brick wall for twenty years now!

Extract from Charles' inventory

Extract from Charles’ inventory

Appendix B: The schedule of Household goods Furniture and Effects reffered to by my Will

2 small Barrells about 8 or 10 Gallons each

3 dozen sorted wines with bottles

1 brass Lock Tap

1 Plate Cover

2 small oval side covers

1 Copper Tun dish 6 cup  and jugs

6 small Goblett Glasses 6 Wine Glasses

1 pair small glass decanters

6 Julley cups and 6 Preserve Cups

1 Tea Tray and Waiter

2 small waiters

1 hand bell

1 oak round tea table

1 small Hand– to chose which she likes

1 pair brass candlesticks

1 pair iron Candlesticks

1 pair japanned chamber candlesticks

1 small mettle tea pot

half a dozen cups and saucers and slop basin

1 sugar basson [basin] cream jug and toasting fork

2 saucepans, 1 skimmer , 1 ladle

1 messelin kettle, 1 copper tea kettle

1 small Dutch oven, 1 dripping pan

1 toaster, 1 small cooking boiler, 1 small frying pan

2 basketts, 1 lantern, 2 good washing tubs

1 swilling tub, 1 bucket, 1 tin bucket

1 small hog tub, 1 coal riddle, 1 small spade

1 set of tea chainy,  the choice of all

1 pair British silver tablespoons

Half a dozen British silver teaspoons

1 set glass cruets and salts and spoons

2 egg cups, 3 common? Tablespoons

2 pairs of blue dishes, 2 dozen sorted blue plates

1 pair Butler Botes,  1 pair blue tureens

1 pair vegetable dishes, 1 pair desert dishes

Some common dishes and plates, basins etc

The Brasses in Quinton’s house to stand as a fixture therein

1 fender, the choice of all

1 set good fire irons

1 set common  irons

6 Windsor chairs, 1 elbow chair, hur [her] low chair

3 or 4 common chairs,

1 pair snuffers and tray

Half a dozen knives and forks, the middle quality

1 carving knife and fork and 1 steele

1 small close horse and 1 larger horse

4 flat irons, 1 attalion iron with 2 cutters

1 small mahogany

2 leaf Pemberock table

In my Bedroom

4 post bedsteads, Chinese furniture, mill flock mattress

1 feather bed, 2 bolsters, 2 pillows, 3 blankets, 1 quilt, 2 bedside carpets in the same room

1 small bedstead with the furniture

The feather bed mattress, blankets, sheets, bed quilt and all thereto belonging

1 night chair, 1 square wash hand stand

1 swing glass, 2 sets window curtains

1 linning [linen] chest, 2 chamber chairs

1 ovell Pear glass, 2 chambers vessels

Inn Room over Little Parlour

1chest of drawers

1 30 Hour clock bought at Jessons Sales

1 washhand hand jug and bassn

2 chamber vessels

The large Famley Bible with about half a dozen other books which she chooses

1 workbox, 1 umberella

1 tea chest that given to her by William Wheyham

1 yellow painted dressing table cloth and basin and jug

1 swing glass, bedside carpets

half a dozen napkins

2 small table cloths, 2 large tablecloths

2 white dimity curtains with the fringe

6 pairs Linning [linen] Sheets

2 bedquilts the choice of all

Also in the room over Little Parlour

1 tend bedstead and furniture, 1 feather bed and two bolster

2 pillow, 3 blankets one pair of sheets and a bed quilt

14th August 1857. Charles C Heritage

Witnesses John Newberry J.H. Whitaker